Names of the Week

Ah, February, the month of love. Valentine’s Day is fast approaching (though if you walked into any department store it’s been approaching since mid-January when all the red hearts and decorations came out.

This month, all names will be of French origin! As France is often called the city of love this seemed appropriate and was a lot of fun to find all these different names.

Amelie

Female
Alternate Spelling: Variation of Amelia
Nickname: Amy/Ami
Pronunciation: Am-ell-lee
Origin: France (Form of Amelia)
Meaning: Hard Working
Well-Known Amelies: Amelie (Morganville Vampires, Rachel Caine); Amelie Leslie (Bonnie Prince Charlie, G.A. Henty); Countess Amelie de Laville (St. Batholomew’s Eve, G.A. Henty); Amelie Nothomb (Belgian Novelist); Amelie Rives Troubetzkoy (American Novelist)


Beau

Male
Alternate Spelling: Bo
Nickname: N/A
Pronunciation: Bo
Origin: France
Meaning: Beautiful; Handsome
Well-Known Beaus: Beau Wilkes (Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell); Beau Hutton (Country Strong), Beau Berkhalter (The  Client List); Beauregard “Beau” Langdon (American Horror Story: Murder House); Beau Bokan (Lead singer of Blessthefall)


Charlotte

Female
Alternate Spelling: N/A
Nickname: Charlie; Lottie
Pronunciation: Shar-lot
Origin: France
Meaning: Feminine
Well-Known Charlottes: Charlotte Lucas (Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen); Charlotte DiLaurentis (Pretty Little Liars); Charlotte York (Sex and the City); Charlotte Honoria Holmes (Charlotte Holmes, Brittany Cavallaro); Charlotte Bronte (Novelist), Charlotte Armstrong (Author)


Noel

Male
Alternate Spelling: N/A
Nickname: N/A
Pronunciation: No-L (Holiday pronunciation, hard L), nol (one syllable, soft L)
Origin: France
Meaning: Christmas
Well-Known Noels: Noel Kahn (Pretty Little Liars, Sara Shepherd); Noel Crane (Felicity), Noel Fisher (Actor); Noel Coward (Playwright), Noel Fielding (Comedian)


Clara

Female
Alternate Spelling: Considered a variation of Claire in some places
Nickname: N/A
Pronunciation: Clah-rah
Origin: France
Meaning: Bright; Clear
Well-Known Claras: Clara Radley (The Radleys); Matt Haig; Clara (Der Sandmann, E.T.A. Hoffman); Clara Boden (White Teeth), Zadie Smith); Clara Oswald (Doctor Who); Clara Bishop (Royals, Geneva Lee)


Fleur

Female
Alternate Spelling: N/A
Nickname: N/A
Pronunciation: flur
Origin: France
Meaning: Flower
Well-Known Fleurs: Fleau Delacour (Harry Potter, J.K. Rowling); Fleur Forsyte (Forsyte Saga, John Galsworthy); Fleur (Being Human); Fleur Jaeggy (Author); Fleur van Eeden (Stuntwoman)


Giles

Male
Alternate Spelling: N/A
Nickname: N/A
Pronunciation: jiles
Origin: France
Meaning: Pledge; Young Goat
Well-Known Giles’: Giles Fletcher (St. George for England, G.A. Henty); Rupert Giles (Buffy the Vampire Slayer); Giles Coren (Novelist); Giles Scott (Architect)


Juliet

Female
Alternate Spelling: Julliet; Juliette
Nickname: Jules; Julie; Julia
Pronunciation: Ju-lee-ett
Origin: France
Meaning: Youthful
Well-Known Juliets: Juliet Capulet (Romeo & Juliet, Shakespeare); Juliet (“The Transformation”, Mary Shelley); Juliet (Love Actually); Juliet Burke (Lost); Juliet Grey (Novelist); Juliet Moss (Water Polo Player); Juliet Turner (Singer-Songwriters)

Facebook | Twitter

Advertisements

Writing Playlist

Writing Playlist - Music Notes.jpg

Journey. Beethoven. Sinatra. The Avenue Q Soundtrack.

The possibilities are endless when it comes to music options in 2018. Which is good because everyone has different taste and different things they enjoy.

And for writers, we all have different things we like listening to when we work.

Now, I work in a music store so I’m literally surrounded by music pretty much all day, every day to the point that I can’t work in silence. I’m listening to Louden Swain’s, Sky Alive, album as I write this.

I’m also a big movie watcher and the way music affects a scene and the mood of the story is something that has always interested me.

For this reason, it’s always super important for me to have music on while I’m writing.

Now, I have different playlists for each of my projects. I used to listen to the same things for everything I was working on (usually film scores), but found this really didn’t help as all it did was make me want to watch the film.

By having different playlists, I can pick the music I listen to for each project and the songs on each of these playlists really helps me get in the right mindset for what I’m working on.

When I’m working on Brave Young Boys I listen to a lot of songs about war and loss. Carrie Underwood’s, “Just a Dream”; Dean Brody’s, “Brothers”; and Rise Against’s, “Hero of War” are just a few.

It’s not the most cheery thing to listen to, but it definitely gets me in the perfect mindset for working.

Kind of on the opposite end of the spectrum, I have a different writing project that involves two people going on a road trip. This playlist consists of (mostly) happy, fun songs.

“Beat This Summer” by Brad Paisley; “500 Miles” by The Proclaimers”’ and “mmmbop” by Hanson are three songs I listen to a lot when working on this particular story.

However, not every song directly relates to a theme of the novel.

In some cases a song will remind me of a character. Or I’ll hear a song and go “oh my god that’s perfect.”

Two instances where this has happened are with “Bad Reputation” by Joan Jett and “Lost Boy” by Ruth B (for two very different writing endeavors).

Everyone likes music. I don’t think I’ve ever met someone who didn’t like music. It’s a universal thing, something that, even if you don’t speak the language in the song, you can still bob your head to the beat.

As a writer, different types of music inspire both my work and myself. I find it helps keep the story moving, gives me ideas for different things, and gives me a connection to my characters. It’s a language that transcends the usual barriers of most other languages.

Now I’d like to hear from you! Do you listen to music when writing? Is there a particular style of music you prefer to listen to, whether in life or when working?

Let me know down below and also let me know if you want to talk more about writing playlists!

Facebook | Twitter

 

 

*Image at start of post does not belong to me, it was found on Google*

World Building: Deciding the Type of World

There are tons of blog posts out there that talk about world building. There are entire books that discuss the different aspects put into creating your own fictional world and all the intricacies of it.
So naturally, because it’s been done so many time before, I decided to add to the madness and give you my thoughts on world building in this new series of posts.

World Building is still a process I’m figuring out for myself so I thought through these posts I could share with you what I’ve learning about the different elements of creating your own fictional universe.

The first and most basic step is deciding on what type of world you’re going to have.

Is it a dystopian world? Utopian? Conformist or evolutionary? Medieval or fantasy?

This is the most basic thing you need to determine because the type of world you’re creating will literally affect every single thing you write and decide for your story.

If you’ve got a dystopian society, the world you create isn’t going to be bright and colourful. It won’t be full of rainbows and people won’t be skipping down the streets. It’ll be dark and gritty and you’ll use a thesaurus to find every variation of the words “dark” and “gritty” to describe the setting.

On the flip side, if the world you create is a utopia then there probably will be rainbows and skipping involved. Your characters will probably be happy with their lives and things will seem good.

Now obviously neither of those descriptions are set in stone and there is always the possibility of a light at the end of the dystopian tunnel or of a dark underworld side in your utopia. But you get the general idea.

Choosing the type of world is just the first step in world building. It’s the first layer of a very elaborate cake. It’s the base for many different things that will happen in your story and happen to your characters.

The world you build does not have to fit exactly in to description box of the world you choose. But you can’t choose to have a totally normal story and then, five pages before the end, a dragon suddenly appears and eats everyone.

I mean, sure, that would be really cool, but it’s not really plausible when the rest of your story was set in a normal, average, every day town where, previous to those last five pages, there were no dragons.

And if you do choose to do that, you better have a really cool sequel lined up and ready to go.

Now, as I said before, this is only the first step. There are so many other aspects to world building that turn it from an idea into an actual thing. The people, the history, all the stuff that doesn’t necessarily make it into your book, but is still so important to your story.

In the coming months I will be talking about world building and the various things that go into it.

If there is anything you would like talked about or anything you would like to add let me know down below!

And let me know: is there a type of world you prefer writing over others? Do you prefer a fantasy universe? A dystopian world? The possibilities are endless and I want to know what you think!

Facebook | Twitter

It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! No, it’s 2015!

2015This is my last post for 2014! I can’t believe I’ve had this blog for five months already, it feels like so much shorter, I can’t believe how fast the time has gone!

This post is going to be a little different than previous ones and relies partially on feedback from you! There’s going to be some changes coming in the New Year and I want to hear from all of you what you think of them!

1) Sunday posts will remain the same. Just like always, I will be talking about writing, giving tips, and talking about my experience as a writer.

2) Also remaining the same are Monday (Quote of the Week), Tuesday (Prompt of the Week), and Thursday (Poem of the Week) posts. These are things I enjoy doing and you seem to like them as well so I’m going to be keeping those.

3) Wednesday Book Reviews is where things start to change. I will still be reviewing books. I am a writing/book blog and that focus is not going to change. However, I will be adding film reviews on Wednesdays. Book reviews will come every other Wednesday (probably the first and third week of the month) while film reviews come on the second and fourth of the month.

I am doing this for two reasons. First, producing four-five well written and honest book reviews is something I’ve found I’m struggling with a bit. I don’t feel like I really have time to always get out what I want to and produce the material I would like. So I feel that cutting back a bit on the book reviews would take a bit of pressure off me and also help me to write better reviews. The second reason I am doing this is because writing film reviews is something I have wanted to try for a while now. It’s not something I ever really had a lot of practice with. I wrote one in ninth grade on a film I did not enjoy so you can probably imagine how that turned out. I think doing so now would be an interesting experience for me and it’s something I’m looking forward to trying.

4) There are two things I was thinking of adding to this blog. I had both ideas back in July when I first started here and I talked to a couple people and they said both ideas sounded interesting. But at the time I felt I already had a lot of content on my blog and didn’t want it to be overwhelming for myself or for readers right off the bat. But as we approach the New Year it’s something I’m considering more and more.

First thing would be a word, its definition and pronunciation.

Second is a name, its meaning, origin, and pronunciation.

These would either be weekly posts on their own, individual days.

OR

Weekly posts on the end of Sunday post (Word) and Wednesday review (Name).

OR

It could be a monthly thing. Ten words posted on the first Monday of the month (or something along those lines) and the same for ten names.

Or if none of you like this idea then I may keep it off this blog all together and post it on my Twitter, Facebook, and/or Tumblr.

5) This next thing will strictly be a Facebook/Twitter thing as it is a 365 day author challenge I am going to try and do. It’s not so much a challenge challenge as it is a challenge to myself to see if I can do it for 365 days. So if you’re interested in that go check out my Twitter and Facebook to keep updated on those things.

6) Finally! This is a really tentative thing and I haven’t 100% decided on whether or not I’m going to do this. I may be starting a second blog. There are things I would like to talk about that aren’t related to writing or reading. Rather, they’re things I’m really passionate about and would like to talk about them somewhere. Again, this is an iffy thing, but if I decide to do it I will definitely let you know!

I apologize for this post be so long (especially #4) and I highly appreciate any feedback any of you may have for me! Thank you so much to everyone who has followed or liked or commented or read on anything on this blog! It’s so amazing to me that people actually want to read what I post on here so thank you so much!

I hope you all have an amazing holiday season and I will see you in the New Year!

Are there any things you would like to see on this blog? Any topic you want more info on? A book I should read and review? Let me know and I will definitely check it out!

Follow me on Twitter | Find me on Facebook | Follow me on Tumblr

Planning for NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMoHappy October everyone! October means many different things, Thanksgiving (in some places), Halloween, Pumpkin Spice Lattes, and the final month before NaNoWriMo. Now, some people prefer to jump into NaNoWriMo headfirst without any planning. This is what I did last year. However, some like to have some idea of what they’re going to be writing about. This is what in doing this year and this is why October can be a very important month to NaNoWriMo participants.

Planning your novel for NaNoWriMo can mean many different things. Some writers plan chapter for chapter, some map out the general plot, others create their characters and go from there. But how do you start?

Well, everyone starts their planning in much the same way: confused and not totally sure where they’re going with their idea. Depending on which method you choose, you may actually stay in this web of confusion for some time. Planning chapter for chapter may sound like it would be the easiest method, and I’m sure when all is said and done and you have the plan laid out in front of you it’s great. But reaching that point can actually be difficult. For my novel this is the main method I’m using and as great as it is it can be hard when you get stuck at a certain point and don’t know how to move forward. Sometimes you have chapters 1-10 done and you know what you want to happen in say, chapters 15-20, but what about 11-14? What happens then? What do you do when you don’t know where to go with your story? Well this is where the other methods of planning can help.

If you map out some of your characters or maybe even your setting, sometimes they can speak to you. The more you know about your characters, the more you know about their motivations and this can help move the plot along even when you don’t really know where it’s going. Of course, the important thing to remember here is that NaNoWriMo is about sitting down and writing. You don’t need to have the entire thing planned out. The truth is, even if you plan and plan and plan, stuff in your story is inevitably going to change.

So what do you think? Are you going to be doing NaNoWriMo this year? How are you getting ready?

Follow NaNoWriMo on Twitter | SIgn up for NaNoWriMo

Follow me on Twitter | Find me on Facebook

Where Do Your Ideas Come From?

IdeasWhere do your ideas come from? When JK Rowling first got the idea for Harry Potter, she was on a delayed train heading to London and she wrote her ideas on napkins. I’m betting that she was sitting on that train, scribbling down her thoughts about a boy wizard with round glasses and a lightening scar, she had no clue what would come of it. The same way you don’t know what will come of your ideas.

All great works of literature started with an idea. It may have been an idea for a character, an idea for a specific part, or even an idea for a place. These ideas may also come from different places. Maybe, Like JK Rowling, you dreamed up your idea. Maybe you met someone while you were out and they inspired that character. Maybe you went on vacation somewhere and the place inspired a whole new world for you to write about. Wherever you got the idea and whatever the idea may it be, the question now is: what do you do with it?

What do you do with your idea? Well the first and simplest thing is to write it down. You may not be able to do anything with your idea right away, but having it may lead to something great in the future. Of course, this itself can be a problem. Say you write down each of your ideas. You now have this list of things that may or may not be connected and may or may not make sense. While each individual idea might not make sense, if you connect it with a couple of your other ideas you may just start to get something solid to work with. This is where the next step comes in.

You’ve got all your ideas written down and you’re trying to connect them so now you need to organize them. I like to think I’m an organized person. My books and movies are in alphabetical order and my clothes are arranged by colour. However, when it comes to my writing I like to refer back to the saying that is, “There’s a method to my madness.” I have so many ideas written down and so many things in progress that sometimes it is a little hard to keep track of. However, this is always a way to have organized chaos if you assign things categories such as: ‘complete work’, ‘in-progress’, ‘future ideas’, and ‘ideas that came from dreams and I have no clue what it means’. Organizing your ideas can be a major help in figuring out what you want to do with them.

Well, now you have your ideas, you’ve written them down, you’ve organized them, now what? Now you write. Write a news article, a poem, a short story, or even the next great novel. Take your idea and run with it. Right now it may seem like just a bunch of scribbles, but those scribbles could just end up being the next number one best seller.

Where do you get your ideas from? How do you organize them?

Fanfiction.net        Archive of our Own         Wattpad

Twitter             Tumblr             Facebook